Cover Story: Bill Tammeus shares 3 ways we can become healers at the 20th anniversary of 9/11

Echoing a Universal Call to Heal the World

Tammeus Says Learning and Compassion are Keys to Healing

“People of faith should be leaders in this effort to unplug terrorism, whether foreign or domestic, given the overwhelming messages about love and acceptance from the world’s great religions,” journalist and author Bill Tammeus writes in his Cover Story marking this week, marking the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In this column, he shares three of his recommendations for “unplugging terrorism” plus a long list of helpful links to learn more about the forces behind the rise in terrorism we are seeing today. And please consider sharing this article with friends via social media or email.

Looking deeper at 9/11’s Legacy …

Ethicist David Gushee:

‘There Were No Innocent Choices Available’

As the nation’s leading Christian ethicist, Dr. David Gushee writes in this column for Baptist News Global that the 20-year legacy of the 9/11 attacks in Afghanistan has turned out to be a spiral of ever-worsening choices. In this carefully balanced analysis of what has unfolded, Gushee warns against blaming any one individual for choices that were made from President Bush to President Biden. Then, he ends on a hopeful note, urging readers to continue pursuing peace. This column asks all of us to stop and think carefully before pointing fingers and assessing blame.

 

A Prayer for 9/11:

‘May We Mend What Has Been Broken’

Echoing themes from both Bill Tammeus’s and David Gushee’s columns, the United Methodist denomination has published this prayer that can be used by individuals and congregations marking the 9/11 anniversary this week. In part, it says: “On this day of solemn remembrance: May we build what has been torn down. May we mend what has been broken. May live your love when hate seems to reign. May we bear witness to the cause of peace.”

Leadership Coach Larry Buxton:

On Last Words

‘Last words can be a summing up of what really matters to you,” Larry Buxton says in this week’s Leading with Spirit video. Larry’s theme this week could be appropriate both for 9/11 reflections and for the Jewish High Holy Days that begin this week. How do we sum up the meaning of a life? Click the link and see where Larry takes you with this week’s 4-minute meditation.

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Rosh Hashanah:

Happy (Jewish) New Year 5782! 

THIS YEAR, STEPHANIE FENTON and JEWISH SCHOLAR JOE LEWIS herald the Jewish High Holy Days with this column on Rosh Hashanah. Joe’s sage advice is: “There’s no better time to try extra, extra hard to get along with others!” And, yes, as always Stephanie does include links to holiday recipes.

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Click on this movie image to read Ed McNulty’s review of Respect.

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Faith & Film

ED McNULTY, for decades, has published reviews, magazine articles and books exploring connections between faith and film. Most of his work is freely published. Ed supports his work by selling the Visual Parables Journal, a monthly magazine packed with discussion guides to films. This resource is used coast-to-coast by individuals who love the movies and by educators, clergy and small-group leaders.

Among Ed’s free reviews and columns:

  1. RESPECT—Ed writes: “Director Liesl Tommy and writer Tracey Scott Wilson’s film biography of Aretha Franklin certainly deserves our respect—and gratitude. Covering about 29 years of the singer’s life, it begins with her as a 10-year-old rousted out of bed to entertain her father’s guests to the recording of her greatest hit album, Amazing Grace.”
  2. PIG—”Director and co-writer Michael Sarnoski’s film about the reclusive supplier of truffles to Portland Oregon’s upscale restaurant presents Nicolas Cage with a role that rises far above what the actor has sunk into for a couple of decades.”
  3. CODA—This 2021 American coming-of-age comedy-drama follows a hearing teenage girl who is a child of deaf adults (CODA for short). The movie is a remake of a French film and currently has a 96 percent approval rating from film critics—including Ed McNulty in his review.
  4. THE GOSPEL OF LUKE— “This Lumo Project film is the last of the four filmed gospels directed by the prolific director/producer David Batty. It is a wonderful addition to any pastor or educator’s video library, bringing to life the words either of the KJV or the NIV translations of the Bible—viewer’s choice. British actor Richard E. Grant reads the NIV text; Sir Derek Jacobi the KJV.”
  5. VIVO—”Move over Pixar and make room for this toe-tapping musical from Sony Pictures Animation studio. The fact that Hamilton’s Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote the songs and voices the main character ought to attract a large audience.”
  6. OPHELIA—”Australian director Claire McCarthy gives us love story based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet. We need to add that the script by Semi Chellas is based on Lisa Klein’s 2006 young adult novel of the same title.”
  7. LUPIN—”The French writer George Kay has created a truly thrilling escapist adventure series with more than a touch of social commentary. He has taken a classic series of French novels revolving around Arsène Lupin as a “Gentleman Thief” and transferred them to a modern day outsider.”
  8. EROICA—Ed McNulty reaches back to 2003 for a wonderful film about the arts, Eroica. In short, it’s a carefully reconstructed drama about Beethoven debuting the piece that people at the time considered a milestone in music history—a unique delight in moviemaking.
  9. AN AMERICAN RHAPSODY—Written and directed by Eva Gardos, this film is based on the filmmaker’s own experience as a young immigrant in Hungary.”
  10. STREET FLOW—”Writer/co-director/star Kery James’ film is set in France, the story of three brothers of African descent who live in one of the huge projects just outside of Paris.”

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