Does patriotism extend to beer? Will you boycott the new Belgian Bud?

Budweiser_in_an_american_parade
I
f America had a national beer, many would say it’s Budweiser. The King of Beers certainly is an American icon. Now it’s wholly owned by InBev, a Belgian conglomerate.
    In July, InBev agreed to pay almost $50 billion for Anheuser-Busch, the maker of Budweiser. The takeover makes InBev the largest brewer in the world. And, it gives the Belgian company about half of the U.S. beer market.
    Will American beer drinkers boycott Budweiser in protest? Will American investors shun InBev stock? If they’re patriotic, they might, even if it doesn’t make economic sense to do so.
    Data show that “patriotic” consumers favor domestic brands when they could get better value by buying imported products. “Patriotic” Americans also invest too much in American companies and not enough in foreign companies, according to research conducted by scholars at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business.
    Love of country influences the choices we make and the policies we support in a wide range of areas.
    What do you think of these data about the choices of self-defined “patriotic” Americans?
    How do you express patriotism when it comes to these kinds of choices?
    What symbols do you see each day that probably are linked to patriotism like the choice of beer?

ALL THIS WEEK, we’ve been exploring provocative issues related to patriotism. Just scroll down to read more! As you do, please, we invite you to ADD your Comment to the discussion, PROPOSE a new topic we should consider or
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