Gender Inequality: Who’s the boss? Do you want the job?

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Gender Inequality
CLICK this chart from the December 2013 Pew report on gender inequality to visit Pew's website and explore the entire report.

CLICK this chart from the December 2013 Pew report on gender inequality to visit Pew’s website and explore the entire report.

Are you the boss or top manager in your workplace? If not, who is: a woman or a man?

About 16% of men in the Pew Research Center’s new survey say they’re the boss or top manager, compared to 10% of women. Members of the Millennial generation (ages 18 to 34) are less likely to say they hold a top spot (about 4%), compared to Baby Boomers (17%) and Generation X (16%). None of these differences are surprising.

So, what is surprising?

What is surprising is that who is the boss correlates closely with aspirations to be the boss—but only when it comes to gender. In every generation—Millennial, Gen X, Boomer—more men than woman say they would like to be a boss or top manager someday.

Who is the boss does not correlate with aspirations to be the boss when it comes to race and ethnicity. About one-third of whites (36%) say that would like to be the boss or a top manager someday in the future. Sixty percent of blacks and the same percentage of Latinos say they would like to be the boss or a top manager. However,  only 16% of whites say they are the boss, while only 6% of blacks and 4% of Latinos say the same.

Aspirations to be the boss or top manager decline with age. Millennials have the highest aspirations, with 65% saying that want the top spot. Half of Generation X (50%) say the same. Only 26% of Baby Boomers have similar aspirations.

Who is the least likely to want to be the boss? White women, according to Pew. Only 29% say they aspire to a top position.

Are you surprised to learn that white women have the lowest career aspirations?

Or that aspirations and reality correlate when it comes to gender, but not when it comes to race and ethnicity?

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Comments

  1. D says

    I find it interesting that the percentage of Baby Boomers and members of Generation X in managerial positions is roughly the same (17% and 16%, respectively). Yet, more than twice as many Generation Xers aspire to be a boss, as compared to Baby Boomers.