Legion (2010)

Rated R. Our ratings: V- 7, L-6, S/N-1. Running time: 1 hour, 40 min.

You chastise mortals
in punishment for sin,
consuming like a moth what is dear to them;
surely everyone is a mere breath.
Psalm 39:11

Michael garbs two bags of weapons and ammo and heads for the desert. Interesting shaped opening!

2010 Screen Gems

This special effects filled horror film, set in a seedy café-gas station in the desert, includes some inter esting Old Testament theology. Just as God grew tired of humans and sent a flood to wipe them out, so now God is determined to rid the earth of their corrupting presence. However the Archangel Michael (Paul Bettany) demurs, leaving God’s Heaven to cast his lot with humanity. After cutting off his wings and healing the scars, he grabs two bags of weapons and ammunition and leaves the city in a cop car, winding up with a diverse group of humans at a diner/garage in the Mojave Desert.

Inside a couple and their rebellious teenaged daughter are impatiently waiting for their car to be fixed; Charlie (Adrianne Palicki), who narrates part of the film, waits on tables (and is pregnant); her father Bob (Dennis Quaid) is trying to fix an old TV set; and Jeep (Lucas Black), who offers her his unrequited love, is repairing the car. After Michael shows up, the apocalypse begins with the arrival of numerous persons infected by the angels still on God’s side. A little old lady attacks, and later many others are turned into zombie-like beings.

For some reason I can’t remember everything hinges on Michael’s saving Charlie’s unborn child. There is some theological talk that could lead to a discussion of the nature of God and the end of the world, but this soon becomes lost in the midst of the carnage caused by Paul and his allies’ firepower mowing down the charging “angels” or zombies. Forget that “spiritual body” stuff espoused by the apostle Paul.

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