Pothole Nation: What is America’s grade on infrastructure?

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Pothole Nation
Report Card on America's Infrastructure

Click on this logo to read the Report Card.

America has a Report Card on its infrastructure, given by the American Society for Civil Engineers (ASCE). What grade does the country get?

Hint: It’s not even a “Gentleman’s C.”

In fact, if a schoolchild came home with America’s infrastructure grade, the kid would be grounded for a year.

The ASCE assigns grades from A to F on the basis of “physical condition and needed fiscal investments for improvement,” according to the ASCE web site. An overall GPA is given to the nation as a whole, and to each state. Grades are also broken down by infrastructure type, such as water and environment, transportation (bridges, roads, ports, transit, etc.), public facilities, and energy.

The nation’s overall grade is a D+. The nation has been getting poor grades for many years. “Since 1998,” says the ASCE, “the grades have been near failing, averaging only Ds, due to delayed maintenance and underinvestment across most categories.”

Of the 16 specific categories, 12 get grades in the D- to D+ range. The four highest grades are bridges (C+), ports (C), rail (C+), and solid waste (B-).

The estimated investment needed by 2020 to fix all this is a whopping $3.6 trillion.

Are you surprised by our near-failing grades?

If you were in charge, what would you do?

What would you fix first? Where would you start?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Series Navigation<< Pothole Nation: Is marijuana the answer?Pothole Nation: Symptom of an underlying disease? >>

Comments

  1. debbie valencia says

    I find the grade that works for me in realizing an issue is where in the line of countries we fall. It is eye opening to see worldwide where the USA lands. Not that we need to be at the top or winning, just that the perspective gives impetus and credible standing on how to move forward in a constructive manner, maybe even taking a learning from the other better performing countries.