What’s surprising and uplifting about the gratitude journal you created


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ell us more about what gives you hope in the midst of this turbulent, yet inspiring, final month of 2008. Tomorrow, we’ll turn back to our urgent discussion about the plight of the auto industry, but today, please, join me in savoring what we have created here!

    Last week, we created a collective gratitude journal, recording our feelings of gratitude and thankfulness. Family, friends, and life itself top our gratitude list. Though we live in tough economic times, material interests – job, money, security – didn’t come close to the top.
    I am touched by your expressions of courage, tenacity and gratitude in the face of life threatening illnesses.
    Greg: “I am thankful that after 2 silent heart attacks and 4 stints in my heart, I am still alive. Alive to enjoy time with my thirteen year old son, and my wife of just over a year.”
    Eoghan Farquhar: “I am thankful for every day I open my eyes and don’t ‘find my own self dead.’ I’m thankful for life.” Almost 40 years ago doctors told him he would not live more than three years.
    CC: “I thank God for life. Just last week I passed the 3-year mark from a near fatal brain aneurysm. I am thankful for family and friends.”
    Ms Aquino-Hughes, a nurse, is grateful that “my patient made it today on my watch.” She is grateful that she “continues to be cancer free.”
    Kmonster is thankful “mostly for my family including a mom who is coming up on one year in remission this January.”
    Ebo: “It’s great to be alive.”

Hispanic family
    Many of you expressed love and appreciation of family and friends and of the institutions in our lives that support them.
    LOA: “I’m thankful that my son is happy at his public school. I appreciate all the wonderful dedicated, sophisticated, responsible adults who surround him.”
    Sandra Xenakis is thankful for her friends and community, who supported her in a recent “turbulent time.”
    Ebo: “I am grateful for my family … my creative son, delightful daughter and loving husband, plus my brothers, sisters, friends and their families.”
    Julie reminds us that we get to choose our attitude in any situation, quoting the parenting wisdom of Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller: “What if the blessings you count this year included situations that aren’t usually regarded as helpful, useful or valuable?
    “Why not be thankful that your youngsters track mud and sand into the garage and house? The next time you stand in the garage furiously sweeping sand and wishing that your children were better behaved, quietly remind yourself that one day you’ll wish you had sand to sweep out of the garage. Love the mud. Love the sand. Be grateful for the signs of the presence of children in your life.”
    I’ll add the wisdom of psychologist and author Viktor Frankl: “Everything can be taken from a man but … the last of the human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”
    Thank you for sharing so freely in our collective gratitude and living the Thanksgiving spirit! I am grateful for all of you.

    Please,
help us build our collective gratitude journal! ADD a Comment, or if you prefer to drop us a quick Email,
you can do that as well.

A Chinese family in America

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